New technology to help landholders recover from flood damage

New technology to help landholders recover from flood damage

  • SEQ Catchments Healthy Land Healthy Water
  • SEQ Catchments RSS feed
  • SEQ Catchments facebook page
  • SEQ Catchments Twitter icon
  • social-youtube
Sign up to receive useful tips, stories and useful information in our monthly newsletter.

Or sign up to receive our media releases

Enter your email address:

20-Nov-2014

Nearly two years on and properties across South East Queensland are still recovering from flood damage which saw stream banks collapse and brought severe damage to valuable cultivated land. 

After a number of attempts to restore the creek bank on one such property at Tarome on the upper reaches of Warrill Creek which were badly affected by the major flood in 2013, SEQ Catchments has been supporting local landholder Nev Bell through the Queensland Government funded Healthy Country Program to implement a new and proven type of technology known as a “log jams” (image to the right). 

SEQ Catchments Project Manager Nat Parker says that this is the first time this has been done in South East Queensland.

“Around 400 large trees will be used to create 7-8 large log jams structures,” he said.

Log jams consist of hardwood trees (i.e ironbark and spotted gum) and are constructed within the creek channel and keyed into the creek bank. 

 The 8-10 m logs are designed in a criss-cross stack to slow and deflect the water flow off the bank, giving creek banks and farming land protection during floods. 

 Log jams also help stop a significant amount of sediment from washing downstream. 

“This is one of the largest log jam projects of its kind in Australia and the first in South East Queensland.”

The design has been led by Dr Andrew Brooks from the Australian Rivers Institute at Griffith University, a leading expert in Australia on restoring badly eroded creeks and streams using ‘log jams’.

Recent long term studies have shown that they protect stream banks effectivity, provide habitat for fish and remain stable for over 10 years. 

“Over 1000 trees will also be planted as part of this project to further stabilise banks into the future.”

Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection, Andrew Powell said the Queensland government supported projects such as this that helped improve resilience, particularly in flood-affected areas.

“As part of the Healthy Country Program, we embrace these proven types of technologies that will prevent the further loss of valuable land,” Mr Powell said.

"These new projects also have the potential to reduce sediment loads in our water supply and Moreton Bay, which have significant economic, social and environmental impacts.”

Comment on this story

Related stories

Locals share Healthy Country learnings with international students Locals share Healthy Country learnings with international students
Locals share Healthy Country learnings with international students

International engineering students from the University of Queensland toured the upper reaches of Warrill Creek in Au.. Read more…