Measuring gully expansion with 3D technology in the Upper Warrill

Measuring gully expansion with 3D technology in the Upper Warrill

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27-Mar-2015

Property owners in the Upper Warrill and Colleyville areas are currently providing valuable assistance to researchers to develop detailed three-dimensional maps of eroded gullies that will help measure the rate of expanding gullies.
  
The technology is being trialled and developed by the Department of Science, Information Technology, and Innovation (DSITI) and is based on laser technology where a survey grade laser scanner develops a three-dimensional model of the surrounding environment. 
 
The laser scanner records tens of millions of points which measure location and elevation at millimetre accuracy. This allows scientists to determine the rate and extent of gully erosion and its contribution to Queensland waterways and bays.

Dr Nicholas Goodwin and Selwyn Counter, a remote sensing scientists from DSITI visited a number of properties in the Upper Warrill recently where SEQ Catchments has worked with landholders since flood events in 2013 to restore gullies, funded by the Queensland Government Healthy Country Programme.

“With this technology, we are hoping to understand in more detail how gullies change over time, and compare degraded gullies with repaired ones,” said Dr Goodwin. 

Nathanial Parker from SEQ Catchments said that this new technology would help to better understand the contribution that gully erosion plays in the landscape and target restoration activities in the future that help protect valuable farming and grazing lands and reduce sediment loss into Warrill creek and the Bremer catchment.

From left to right, Scientist Dr Nicholas Goodwin, Landholder Evan Christensen and Selwyn Counter watch the Terrestrial scanner mapping a gully at Evans Property in Tarome, near Aratula

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