Locals share Healthy Country learnings with international students

Locals share Healthy Country learnings with international students

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20-Aug-2014

International engineering students from the University of Queensland toured the upper reaches of Warrill Creek in August, learning from local community groups about ways to deliver the best environmental outcomes for our region.


SEQ Catchments’ Upper Warrill project coordinator, Nat Parker, who works with landholders in the area, shared learnings about community engagement and working in partnership with the local community in South East Queensland.

“Much of South of East Queensland is privately owned and as a community organisation, working together with the community is central to everything that we do,” he said.


“It means that we can really understand the issues people are facing on their land and work together to provide sustainable solutions.”

The students from nine different countries including Bangladesh, Honduras, Indonesia and America, visited sites at Tarome, including those that suffered significant flood damage and others implementing sustainable grazing practices.

SEQ Catchments has worked with landholders on these initiatives as part of the State Government’s Healthy Country program to reduce sediment loss into our creeks and waterways.

One of the stops included visiting Laurie Wolter, a 5th generation farmer, who suffered significant damage after the 2011 and 2013 along Bible Creek (a tributary of the Upper Warrill) where some of his cultivation land was lost to the widened stream.

The students were particularly interested in the green engineering works implemented to restore a section of the creek, making Laurie’s property more resilient to future floods and help minimise any further loss of land.

Course director Dana Kelly, with family links to the Silverdale area attended on the day, joined by guest lecturer, Chris Rinehart, who has links to the Upper Warrill catchment and was able to provide the students with a brief overview of the history of the area.

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